INTERVIEW: Bad Suns

INTERVIEW: Bad Suns

Photos by Marissa Lujan

Photos by Marissa Lujan

California based indie rock group Bad Suns found massive success with their debut album Language & Perspective back in 2014, with singles like "Cardiac Arrest" and "Salt" dominating the alternative airwaves. The four piece continues to showcase their seasoned musicianship and chemistry on their sophomore record Disappear Here, currently wrapping up their predominantly sold out tour with Nashville indie pop outfit COIN. I spoke with Bad Suns front man Christo Bowman via email about stepping out of your comfort zone, growth, and more in our latest interview below.


How’s the tour with Coin been so far?
 
It's been a whirlwind. Every city brings a unique life to the songs. Each night's electricity carries into the next day, and it just keeps moving. This is my favorite tour we've ever done. Its different this time.


 
 After having so much success with Language & Perspective, was there any sense of pressure when you guys started writing Disappear Here?
 
We didn't worry about the plausibility of success with this album. That's one of the great mistakes bands keep making. Rather than trying to wedge ourselves into today's radio-landscape, we focused on improving as a band and as songwriters. If you can do that with your sophomore album... to hell with the rest.


 
Eric Palmquist, who produced MUTEMATH and Night Riots’ new records, worked with you guys on the record. How was that?
 
It was great. To us, he is Eric Palmquist, who produced 'Language and Perspective.' That's who we worked with. It was an important process, taking a sound we were proud of establishing and pushing it into new territories.
 
 I hate to reference a tweet, but a few months ago you said, “If ‘L&P’ was a summer album, “Disappear Here” belongs to the autumnal season…”. Was there an ‘ah-ha’ moment that set the theme for Disappear Here?
 
 
There were several ah-ha moments. At times I began to feel like Dale Cooper, a few months into the writing process. It can be a bit like detective work, putting together an album that means something to you. This album means a great deal to me.



It’s interesting because a lot of musicians say it’s easier for them to open up on a song then it is with another person. Does that apply to you while you’re writing lyrics?
 
 Songs often begin as ideas not meant to be heard by others. It's about expression. You have to decide what you're comfortable with sharing, and oftentimes it's important to step outside of that comfort zone if you want to be authentic.

Something that’s always stood out in your music is the level of musicianship. How do you think the band has grown since you first started playing together?
 
Well, we have hundreds and hundreds of shows under our belt now. We were a pretty tight live band to begin with; I'm often surprised by what we can do together, these days. 


 
When it comes to touring, was there anything you learned while supporting Language & Perspective that you keep in mind now?
 

What not to do. You hand a 19 year old kid the keys to his lifelong dreams and it's party time. We're much more focused and aware of our goals and priorities now.
 
 
What are your guys’ favorite songs to play from the new album?
 
"Maybe We're Meant To Be Alone" has been a highlight for me on this tour. It's different from anything we've ever had in the live set.
 
What are some of your favorite releases from this year?
 
Porches : 'Pool' 
Joyce Manor : 'Cody'
Yumi Zouma : 'Yoncalla' 
All of these are good
Jamie XX : 'In Colour' is my favorite release of the past two years.

Any advice for aspiring musicians?
 
Make sure you know what you're getting yourself into; you're never working too hard. Love what you do.
 


 Stream Disappear Here below: 

 

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